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Babington Burners and Parts US / UK

 

BabingtonNozzlePrinciplesOne.jpg (86017 bytes) BabingtonNozzleWVOBurnerBallDetails090701.jpg (16209 bytes)

Babington Oil Burner - Waste Vegetable Oil

Patent 3,425,058  ( Robert S. Babington, Inventor )

Babington Technology

babingtonp1.jpg (58675 bytes) babingtonp2.jpg (47504 bytes) babingtonp3.jpg (155392 bytes) babingtonp4.jpg (169314 bytes) babingtonp5.jpg (163695 bytes)

  MK_III_BabingtonBurner_Oil_Pump111901.jpg (53008 bytes) MK_III_BabingtonBurner111901.jpg (54370 bytes)

"The Army tried for a long time to get this to work, but when the Marine Corps took the lead on the program, they discovered a new piece of technology called the Babington Airtronic Burner," Velez said. "Conventional high-powered burners shoot air and fuel through a nozzle, which gets clogged.  This burner uses the principle of the whale.  Simply put, when a whale sprays a plume of water, it is not spitting water, but air.  There is a thin film of water that forms over the hole and when the air blows out, it atomizes the water, making it look like a spray. "The burner uses the same principle," he explained. "It is a sphere with a little slit in it.  Fuel runs over the top of the sphere and air is pushed through the slit.  When fuel touches the slit, it is atomized for complete combustion." This technology enables the burner to achieve a temperature of 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Velez said that because the burner produces such high heat, there are no emissions.  

How To Build! 

John Archibald <oreminer@rconnect.com>

The "military meals on wheels" thing has a different burner than my version. They use a slit and I use a hole. They both work, but mine is a lot easier to make, I think. I bought a Class A flue pipe and some other parts to stick a chimney flue up through my garage roof today. This is good for wood stoves too, triple wall stainless steel. It gets darn cold here in Minnesota in winter and I have a machine shop out there. 

Nature's Babington Nozzle_Blue Whale's Blow Hole.jpg (70279 bytes)

Here is nature's concept of the Babington, and the concept behind it's operation. A whale, spouting air through it's blowhole, atomizing the film of water that covered it.

This is a sketch of the main parts and principles of operation of the Babington Nozzle Burner I have just built for burning WVO, Waste Vegetable Oil or any other heavy oil. John Archibald, 9-8-01.
Atomiser end of Babington Nozzle Burner.
Babington Burner Nozzle details
Babington Burner on Waste Veg Oil at 40 psi
Babington Burner head on view
Babington Burner - rear 3/4 view

BabingtonNozzleWVOBurnerBallDetails090701.jpg (16209 bytes)


Ball is visible beyond pipe fittings. Pipe fittings have two elbows for "swivel-like" action for alignment during experimentation. Need not be this complicated in the final form.

You can see the plastic tube coming in from the right...this just pokes through the 6-inch pipe and terminates in a 1/4-inch copper tube. Crankcase oil squirts out the end of this tube and onto ball, at a few PSI. Just enough to get it there. You want some "angle of the dangle" adjustment here to find the optimum "sweet spot" of impingement.

The two 0.010 inch* diameter holes are on the far side of the ball...away from the viewer. You can see the pressure regulator on the left and the air and oil valves near the foreground. Air projects from these holes at 15-20 PSIG*

The 6-inch pipe is about 2 feet long. I have it sloping slightly toward the viewer when running so that the oil drips out and down into a catch pan...the sump...from which the gear pump picks it up and sends it back over the ball. Gear pump runs all the time.

It takes an ordinary 6-inch steel sheet metal flue pipe if you want to vent the exhaust up a chimney, etc. It pays to line the "firebox" with a refractory furnace cement. This keeps the flame hot as things warm up. Flame is a little over a foot long and is a whitish yellow when things are working right. And it roars, but not too loud...about like an ordinary fuel oil burning furnace that you would find in a house. perhaps a bit louder because my set up is so crude and the sound radiates with ease.

The 6-inch pipe will get almost red hot if you run it for a while. I have had it red hot. Be careful that your sheet metal flues pipes do not get this hot...they will have no mechanical strength then and will fall and then disaster is upon you. So watch it carefully. If it starts to get out of hand, just stop the oil pump...it will go out immediately.

If your gear pump can handle it, there is no need to filter the WVO. French fry bits won't hurt anything, but I plan to poor / run my WVO through a window screen to stay on the less chunky side of sanity. 

I may be able to get better images later. I think I have one of the ball assembly outside of the 6-inch pipe so that you can see what is going on with the plumbing, etc.

One hole is enough to make heat enough to drive you out of the kitchen! If you do put in more than one hole, make sure they are on the equator and fairly close to each other...about an 1/8-inch apart.

New Notes:

Bed balls would be ideal if you can get them.

Hole size optimum is 0.010 inches.

I run mine at between 25 and 30 PSIG for really heavy crankcase oil.

I preheat to about 110 F.

I use an hydraulic gear pump running very slowly from a gear reducing
drive. About a quart a minute is enough oil.

If you want more heat just drill in more holes on the "equator". Slits
are hard to make thin. That's why I used holes. I get circuit board
drills. Solid carbide and they come in the right size and have an
1/8-inch shank that fits in the collet in the Bridgeport. Run at 3,800
RPM and "peck" drill 0.005 inches at a time until through the ball. Use
the quill stop for this. This way you won't break the drill.

Archibald

February 2, 2003 update:

Ken & Steve,

I've been meaning to make a change to my MK III Babington Burner for quite some time now and finally today I got it done.

Before today's change the oil from the sump was pumped up toward the ball through some copper tubing through a valve and then some more copper tubing right to the north pole of the ball. With that scheme the oil never really got hot. Warm, but not hot.

So today I wound about 6 feet of 1/4-inch copper tubing around the outside of the 6-inch horizontal "barrel" of the burner. I didn't want this coil of 1/4-inch copper tubing to actually touch the barrel because the barrel is quite hot and I didn't want that heat to "char" the oil inside the copper tube. That could lead to it clogging over time I thought.

Results:

The oil is now hot to the touch when it leaves this coil and heads to the north pole of the ball. It used to be just warm.
The exhaust coming out of the smokestack is just "wavy hot air"...no smoke.

The flame is burning whiter than before and I believe I am using less oil. ( I'll have to try to measure that someday. )

I have attached some images that I took today and you may both post these to your web sites if you so desire. You may wish to leave the old ones on there so that people can compare, etc.

Anyhow, the MK III Babington is much improved now. I should have done this over a year ago, but you know how that goes. Others have reported that this preheating helps, but now I have done it and that should be an independent check, etc.

One thing to remember: Don't preheat too high and char the oil inside the copper tubing which would clog it. I think some folks were making that mistake. I'm not trying to "vaporize" the oil in the copper tubing. I'm just trying to get it pretty hot. Vaporizing is not required with the Babington technology.

So that's the latest on the Babington.

I'm also not having any trouble with carbon build up in the barrel like I used to there for a while. The cause of that was bringing in COLD combustion air over the back of the ball. This kept the oil on the ball very cold and it didn't break up as finely at the air jet. That led to incomplete combustion and hence the heavy carbon build up in the barrel. I haven't cleaned out the barrel in weeks! I used to have to clean it out once a week.

Instead of bringing the combustion air in over the back of the ball, I drilled a few more holes in the side of the barrel. You'll see these extra holes in the images. The air now comes in radially at a point just before the "middle" of the flame front.

These changes have made all the difference in the world. Note the white hot flame color visible in these new holes. And this is with a flash on the camera!

Arch

MK III Babington Burner PreHeater 1 JHA.jpg (55911 bytes) MK III Babington Burner PreHeater 2 JHA.jpg (46555 bytes) MK III Babington Burner PreHeater 3 JHA.jpg (57924 bytes) MK III Babington Burner PreHeater 4 Overall JHA.jpg (50843 bytes)

For more Info, See http://groups.yahoo.com/group/wastewatts

Idea Starters:

Fire Tube Boiler

http://lakeweb.net

more pics and diagrams:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/wastewatts/files/Small%20BabBall-orfice%20pics/

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/wastewatts/files/Babington/

http://www.geocities.com/wastewatts/babington.html

Steve,

I don't know if this will be of any interest, but I have just finished
the steam engine shown in the attached images.
SA STEAM ENGINE FLYWHEEL IN CENTER REAR QTR 050202.jpg (57021 bytes)
Starting from scratch I first did a theoretical design, then used
AutoCAD to draw it up and finally machined and welded it in my Shop. I
started this last fall just after the Babington MK III was completed.

Plans will be available for sale soon. I have a few more detail drawings
to add.

It is a nominal 1.0 horsepower engine, with a 3" bore and stroke, suitable for 
small generators or pumps, etc. Even a small car or a boat up to about 25 feet could be
powered with this engine quite nicely.SA STEAM ENGINE FLYWHEEL IN CENTER SIDE 050202.jpg (57578 bytes)

Originally I was going to have this coupled with a mono-tube flash
boiler fired with a Babington burner burning used soybean oil of course.
The result would be a car, "The Great Northfield Steam Runabout". Still
heading for that goal.

Plaster this about if you wish.

John Archibald
Northfield, Minnesota

See our pages on Steam Engines

WARM CHOW A HOT ITEM DURING COLD WEATHER OPS MARINE CORPS BASE

Quantico, Va. -- When the weather is 35 degrees below zero, the only warmth for military personnel during cold weather operations comes from their own warm thoughts. Bundled up in parkas and anything else to keep warm, many consider themselves lucky to have a Meal-Ready-to-Eat that isn't frozen.

Unexpectedly, a HMMWV pulls into the campsite and, within five minutes, the smell of hot food comes floating on the air.  It's MGySgt. Charlie Velez, Marine Corps field feeding project officer, and the new tray ration heating system.

"In the old days, there were troops on the front lines stuck with MREs or C-rations and such,"  Velez said.  "Now, a commander has the flexibility to go out there and give the guys hot meals.  Instead of rotating the troops off the front lines, you can change your whole strategy of how to fight because you're always going to be able to give them a hot meal.

 "Morale is a big factor in any combat situation," he continued.  "If the troops' morale isn't high, the combat efficiency of the unit is greatly decreased.  While there are limitations to how much you can improve quality of life in combat, a hot meal gets the troops off MREs.  I mean, MRE's are tough after about 10 days." 

According to Velez, this is the biggest development for Marine Corps food services in the 28 years he has been in the Corps. "We're cooking on World War II equipment," Velez said.  "If you go to the Field Feeding Museum in Luxembourg, the display that shows Americans fighting Germans wit  a field kitchen has the same stuff in it we use today. "When I went through the museum, the tour guide said, 'Boy, isn't it amazing.  Look how archaic this stuff is.'  I said to myself, 'yeah, and we're still using it.' " 

The requirements document called for  mobile field feeding equipment that can heat food on the move.  Velez said this means that the food is cooking while traveling in the HMMWV. According to Velez, when the equipment arrives at a site, it can be set up and have hot food ready to be served within five minutes.  It is designed to feed 250 people at a stop, or 500 people in three stops. The system is a self-contained unit.  A case has 18 portions of food with trays and utensils for each serving.  There is also a repair kit included with the heater that includes a spare burner. 

"The Army tried for a long time to get this to work, but when the Marine Corps took the lead on the program, they discovered a new piece of technology called the Babington Airtronic Burner," Velez said. "Conventional high-powered burners shoot air and fuel through a nozzle, which gets clogged.  This burner uses the principle of the whale.  Simply put, when a whale sprays a plume of water, it is not spitting water, but air.  There is a thin film of water that forms over the hole and when the air blows out, it atomizes the water, making it look like a spray. "The burner uses the same principle," he explained. "It is a sphere with a little slit in it.  Fuel runs over the top of the sphere and air is pushed through the slit.  When fuel touches the slit, it is atomized for complete combustion." This technology enables the burner to achieve a temperature of 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Velez said that because the burner produces such high heat, there are no emissions.  

There are also several cross-over applications including medical uses. The burner is operated on diesel fuel, but it can burn any combustible liquid, including liquids such as peanut oil. It can also handle fuel containing as much as 20 percent water, according to Velez. It also has an automatic turn-off if the vehicle rolls over.  A 30-degree tilt on either side or a 60-degree tilt front-to-back, causes the burner to shut off automatically. "We're going to start fielding the new system in January," Velez said. "Soon, the Marines in the field will not have to rely solely on MREs or vacuum cans with food. 

"I was in Twentynine Palms, Calif., a few weeks ago.  They vacuum can 6,000 portions of food to the field that is 2 1/2 hours away.  By the time they get there the food is cold." There are 10 dinner menus and 10 breakfast menus.  Velez said work is being done to develop 20 more dinner menus. While tray rations have been around for several years, they are not widely used because there has been no previous cooking system.  According to Velez, one way that has been used to cook the food is to fill a trash can with water and place a heater in it.  Unfortunately, this can't be used to cook food on the go.  It is either cooked before departing, which can allow the food to get cold, or it is cooked on site with the problem of filling the trash can with water. "The new system is fantastic.  There are a lot of things you can do with it," Velez added. (Cpl. Chris Pence, MCB Quantico, Va.) -USMC-


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